Music

“Malaika”

I am really grateful for my parents. The culture(s) they exposed me to even as I grew up in the densely populated metropolis called Lagos. I remember the diversity of music that would flood through our home. Everything from Dolly Parton to Perry Como and from Motown to Fela. Today I’m nostalgic about one of the first love songs I ever memorized. “Malaika” was a beautiful Tanzanian love song by South Africa’s own Miriam Makeba (a.k.a. Mamma Africa). We had the version with the duet with Harry Belafonte (a.k.a. The King of Calypso–I remember running through the house screaming “Day-O” at the top of my lungs! 😂😂

The richness of the song and its singers wasn’t lost on me as a kid. You have a South African and an American singing a Tanzanian song (in Swahili) and it sounded absolutely breath taking. Even as I listen today, it’s like that relaxed feeling after an amazing yoga session…you just want to float over to hug a loved one.

Think I’m kidding? Take a listen: https://youtu.be/q8jxALtWGVQ

So what are they saying: the song is sung by a young man in love with his girlfriend but unfortunately can not afford the dowry or bride price to marry her. This depresses him and he repeatedly laments.

Malaika, nakupenda Malaika

Malaika, nakupenda Malaika

Ningekuoa mali we, ningekuoa dada

Nashindwa na mali sina we, ningekuoa Malaika

Pesa, zasumbua roho yangu

Pesa, zasumbua roho yangu

Nami nifanyeje, kijana mwenzio

Nashindwa na mali sina we

Ningekuoa Malaika

Kidege, hukuwaza kidege

Kidege, hukuwaza kidege

Ningekuoa mali we, ningekuoa dada

Nashindwa na mali sina, we

Ningekuoa Malaika

Malaika, nakupenda Malaika

Malaika, nakupenda Malaika

Ningekuoa mali we, ngekuoa dada

Nashindwa na mali sina we, Ningekuoa Malaika

Translation:

Angel, I love you angel
angel, I love you angel
If I could get the property for you, I would marry you
If I did have the money , I could get married angel

Make money, frustrate my soul
Make money, frustrate my soul
And what can I do, boyfriend
I do not have the money I do not have
I could get an Angel

The cage, cuts the cage
The cage, cuts the cage
If I could get the property for you, I would marry you
I do not have the money I do not have
I could get an Angel

angel, I love you angel
angel, I love you angel
If I could get the property of you, I would marry you
When I lost the wealth I did not have, I could find Angels

This month three of my cousins will have their traditional weddings back home. It isn’t lost on me even in my own family the richness these ceremonies will infuse into our culture. You see, one cousin’s husband is Polish, the other’s is Swedish, and the third’s Nigerian. All three sisters are having their traditional ceremonies at the same time. All three couples have found love across cultural barriers and if you research “Mailaka” you’ll see that is also at the root of the song. Historians differ on who wrote it first, or who recorded it first. But all agree Mamma Africa made it famous and it found a way into my psyche years and years ago.

Thank you mum and dad for exposing me to GOOD music. It has helped me connect to so many people all over the world. Thank you Harry Belafonte for lending your voice to this love song. Thank you Mamma Africa for the first Swahili I ever learned as a kid, even though it took years to understand what I was actually saying.

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A night of culture…musically speaking

So I’ve been living in my apartment since July.  Other than my family’s visit over Labor Day, I haven’t entertained at the loft…well, until this past Wednesday. “The Loft”…that’s what I call my place. I live on the top floor of a shopping complex; next to a fitness club and with the view below. To say this chapter has been therapeutic is an understatement. I enjoy waking up before dawn to the smell of freshly baked bread and a view that heralds God’s magnificence.

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And so for the past five weeks I’ve been facilitating discussions among a group of 12 individuals from 12 different countries. Discussions cover a range of topics from migration to terrorism, transnational organized crime and gender equality. These amazing professionals from various fields have taught me so much since we started this journey together. They are part of a larger group of 105 participants attending a course on applied security.

Last Saturday we held a Culture Night where all 105 participants got a chance to showcase their individual cultures with food, drinks, pictures, and art. It was an amazing event…so much food from as far as Honduras all the way to Afghanistan and South Africa. But then on Wednesday, I experienced a different kind of culture night when 10 of the 12 in my discussion group dropped by my apartment. I knew some of them were fans of music from the 80s and so I had a video playlist projecting on the wall. The balcony seemed to become a nice gathering spot despite the cold but clear night.  We talked about family, travels, and joked about the teams loss during volleyball.  I learned more about them as individuals, their aspirations, likes, and dislikes.  I also marveled at how this group that five weeks ago had never met, came to become a well-oiled intellectual and social machine.

Back inside I switched roles from party host to “Karaoke DJ”. Hearing people from so many different countries sing along to Bob Marley’s “Three Little Birds”, Fugees “Killing Me Softly”, or Michael Jackson’s “I Just Can’t Stop Loving You” was a hoot.  Frank Sinatra’s “I Did It My Way” was the fan favorite.  But, the highlight came when I asked each of them to pick a favorite music video from their country. I then played the video on the big screen and we all got to enjoy a healthy sampling of world music.  It was so much fun to see each of them temporarily forget the challenges each of their countries faced while excitingly digging through YouTube for a favorite music video.  I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to talk about the universality of music and how people with so many differences can also have so much in common while coming together to sing popular tunes.

What a night…definitely up there among the memorable ones!

There’s just something about fellowship, even through music, that connects humanity and opens us up to be better listeners especially in the company of those who don’t look, sound, or even live like us. I am blessed to have had a rich multicultural journey thus far and one that has less to do with the places I’ve been but more to do with the people I’ve encountered.

 

“Show hospitality to one another without complaining.  Just as each one has received a gift, use it to serve one another as good stewards of the varied grace of God.” — 1 Peter 4:9-11 (NET) 

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